1950s & 1960s Windows

Determine the types of windows and document their location and construction.
johnleeke
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1950s & 1960s Windows

Postby johnleeke » Sun Jun 19, 2016 7:23 pm

Most of this Forum is about Pre-1940 windows. Here we consider mid-20th century windows made in the 1950s and 1960s. These later windows are fundamentally different than earlier windows.

Many 1950s and 60s windows are worth taking care of, and some of them are now even considered historic. As with older windows, stick with the intent of the original maker, keeping with the same materials and details used in their original construction.

Unlike most traditional pre-1940 windows, these later windows depend more on sealants to keep water out of the window system and the building. I have worked on quite a few of these later windows and used two current sealant products: Waterborne acrylic such as Alex Plus, and oil-based one-component moisture-cure urethane such as Sonolastic's NP1, both work well, NP1 has greater elasticity and seems to have a longer service life although application and cleanup is more involved that with the acrylics.

You can often find replacement parts for these windows at the the following companies:

Blaine Window Hardware: https://blainewindow.com/

Window Parts, for Andersen parts: http://www.windowparts.com

Swisco: http://www.swisco.com/

Ultrafab: http://www.ultrafab.com/

sarah
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Re: 1950s & 1960s Windows

Postby sarah » Thu Sep 08, 2016 4:34 am

Firstly I want to thank you for all this wonderful information we can get online. It's been exactly what I need for this project to restore my windows. However I am having some trouble finding some information concerning the parting bead on my windows.

The house was built in 1950 and has original windows. They are double hung with a spring balance. I am attempting to take them out and repair them as there's large chunks of glazing coming out and I am getting water seeping in to the wall below the window. (I expect I will need to repair and replace the sill). At the moment I have successfully gotten the lower sash out, however the process has raised some questions and I am hoping this is the best place to get these answers.

The parting bead seems to have metal weather stripping over it. However I haven't been able to find anything like it online. I'm not sure if a replacement is in order or not. It looks like a metal cap that has been screwed over the wood parting bead then there are two thin weather stripping channels on each side. Whomever installed it had 2 pieces of it installed on one parting bead. The lower sash has weather stripping stapled to the outer side of it that fits into the channel on the metal cover for the parting bead (but only on the top portion of it). I'm not sure if replacing or trying to clean up the current stuff is the right thing to do. Or if replacing it with something entirely different will be the right thing to do. And where to find something. My googling hasn't turned up anything similar. Here's a photo.

Thank you for any assistance!

johnleeke
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Re: 1950s & 1960s Windows

Postby johnleeke » Thu Sep 08, 2016 2:53 pm

Sarah,

Welcome to the Forum!

Try to save the existing weatherstrip. This may be painstaking work until you develop the methods and skills that work best, then it will go easier.

Remove paint if it is limiting the movement of the sash. Use chemical paint stripper, keeping it off the surrounding wood. Use sharpened sticks of wood for scrapers and short-bristled brushes and rags for cleanup rather than metal scrapers, which would scratch the metal.

Straighten out bent weatherstrip. I'd have to see more photos to suggest methods and tools for this.

Let's figure out what metal it is. Is that rust I see in the photo? If so it is steel. Confirm that by touching it with a magnet.

The metal may need some treatment and cleanup. I'll work out some details on this for you.

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Re: 1950s & 1960s Windows

Postby sarah » Thu Sep 08, 2016 6:48 pm

Thanks for the quick reply! The metal is not steel, not magnetic at all. So aluminum? And I don't think it is rust. There's just several different colors of paint everywhere, and dark red and brown are two of the colors. I did take some more pictures.

Right side of window. The area where the screws were are very bent and dimpled inwards. The window would open, but it usually would take a lot of work to do so. The top sash doesn't move at all and I am going to work on removing the metal strips and try and get that top sash out too. I'll probably be able to get better pictures of the weather stripping for you then.

Left side of window. This side looks a little better. But you can really see all the paint. I spent a good part of a week getting paint removed from all my heat registers in my house because they painted over those too. I used a product called citristrip with a wire brush that seemed to work pretty well. Then I used a knife to just get the remaining bits out of all the nooks and crannies. Will that same procedure work for this? I then coated the registers in primer and a high gloss spray paint. I'm assuming that will probably not be what we want to do for these though?

The lower sash weather stripping Here's the weather stripping that was threaded into the channel on the parting bead. It looks like it's in pretty decent condition other than all the paint that's on it. Should I remove it from the sash? I plan on using a heat gun to remove the paint and remaining glazing from the sash. Then I was going to prime with oil based Kilz Complete (I wasn't going to pretreat as the wood seems in decent condition), reglaze the sash, put on another coat of kilz sealing the glazing, before painting with Behr Ultra exterior paint in semi gloss and Behr Ultra interior semi gloss for their respective sides of the sash. As for the spring balance, I wasn't going to take it out, but do you think I should to clean it off? It doesn't look too bad.

Thank you so much for all this advice!! Let me know if you need more pictures. I will work on getting the metal weather stripping off the parting beads so I can get a clearer photos of those for you too.

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Re: 1950s & 1960s Windows

Postby johnleeke » Fri Sep 09, 2016 6:56 pm

Removing Paint:
Citristrip should be OK on this metal too, but go gently with removal of the goop because aluminum is much softer than the cast iron of your radiators. We've found that Alcohol (from the paint shop, not rubbing alcohol) worked as a better final cleanup on wood than the Citristrip clean up material. Test this idea in a small area first.

Paint:
Your paint schedule sounds OK. I would use exterior paint on the sash exterior AND interior.

Spring Balance:
the spring balance, I wasn't going to take it out, but do you think I should to clean it off? It doesn't look too bad.


Clean off all metal. Simply vacuuming out the spiral/spring mechanism to get out loose dust and grit may be enough.
Does it look like this mechanism was oiled or greased, with dark residue, or where the oil is holding an accumulation of dust?

Don't paint any metal.

Some metal parts may need to be lubricated if they were originally, such as, perhaps, the spiral/spring mechanism if it was originally oiled.

Sliding metal-to-metal parts could be lubricated with wax, such as parafin (candle wax), or paste wax. Apply sparingly, if paste wax wipe on and off with a rag, allow to dry, then wipe again with a dry clean rag.

sarah
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Re: 1950s & 1960s Windows

Postby sarah » Sat Sep 24, 2016 11:00 pm

So this is where I'm at. Paint has been stripped and windows are pretty much prepped for priming. There's some damaged to a muntin that I'm going to need to repair with epoxy. There was a huge crack in it and it looked like paint was used to try and glue the crack together previously. Aside from that I've also got the paint removed from the weather stripping. I'm a little concerned about it. Most looks to be in decent condition, but there are some sections where the weather stripping was banged up and the metal started to split along the folds. It seems really fragile. The weather stripping on the sill, top and meeting rail seems fine though. It's just the weather stripping from the sides.

This is the weather stripping on the upper sash. A top down photo.
This is a place where the metal is damaged.
When looking at the side of it you can see daylight from a crack.
This is the weather stripping from the parting bead.
Another view of parting bead weather stripping.
This is where it was screwed on. The force of the screw bent the metal and it bulges out slightly causing a catch when sliding back and forth on the weather stripping on the sash.

I'm not sure what needs to be done at this point. It doesn't look like this exact weather stripping is made any more, so I'd have to try something different if I needed to replace it. But with the cracks in the metal I'm not sure it can really be repaired?

And one final question. Along the outer edge of the top sash a section of window was left unpainted. I'm assuming I should do the same thing?

Again, thank you so much for your help!


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