Current thoughts on Allback Linseed Oil paint?

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yacht_boy
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Current thoughts on Allback Linseed Oil paint?

Postby yacht_boy » Tue May 31, 2016 2:42 am

Hi John,

I'm embarking on a restoration project to salvage 42 old windows, most of them dating to the 1890s. I'm intrigued by the Allback paint and putty, but keep seeing conflicting info about mold and fungus growth and other problems. Some of the info online is now quite outdated, and searching the forums can be difficult.

Can you provide an update on whether or not Allback paints are worth using? Will I run into mold and fungus issues? Do they live up to the advertising hype? I like the idea of using a historic paint, and I really like the idea of being able to immediately paint after applying putty since I want to have these windows finished in a couple of months. I'm also considering using Allback to repaint the clapboards when I eventually pull off the vinyl siding.

Thanks,

Jason

johnleeke
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Re: Current thoughts on Allback Linseed Oil paint?

Postby johnleeke » Tue May 31, 2016 3:53 pm

Over the past 10 years Allback Linseed Oil putty and paint has had problems with mildew growth on the surface of the paint. (See this discussion over at the Historic HomeWorks Forum: http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1625 )
The Allbacks responded with a zinc white additive for the paint that is intended to limit this problem. Some people have found this to be effective.
I find these Allback products very interesting and I am still doing limited tests of the Allback Linseed Oil putty and paint. I did get mildew growth on the paint surface, which took 8 years to develop in one case. I suspect the zinc additive is effective, but have not yet gone through enough years to confirm that to my own satisfaction. I have not yet decided to use Allback paint and putty on whole projects, but I do continue to test it because I like the idea of this sustainable paint that does not use petrol-chemical materials.

yacht_boy
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Re: Current thoughts on Allback Linseed Oil paint?

Postby yacht_boy » Tue May 31, 2016 6:51 pm

Thanks. I might just take a chance and use it for this project, since the windows will be protected by ugly exterior storms for at least the next few years. I'll definitely add zinc. I might also do a test patch with zinc on some existing exterior clapboards on an outbuilding and see how it holds up for a couple of years while I save up money to remove the asbestos shingles and restore the original clapboards.

If I do end up getting mildew, can I simply paint over it with another oil-based primer and paint, or do I have to take the paint all the way back to bare wood?

In your experiments, have you been using the linseed oil and penetrol mix as a base coat/primer? Would you mix the zinc into that base coat, or only mix it in with the paint? I'm considering using linseed oil and turpentine 50/50 for my base coat.

johnleeke
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Re: Current thoughts on Allback Linseed Oil paint?

Postby johnleeke » Tue May 31, 2016 7:27 pm

In my testing I have used Hans Allback's recommended procedures, including a pre-treatment of Allback Boiled Linseed Oil "driven" into the wood by warming it with an infrared heat lamp, not exceeding 140 degrees F. at the surface of the wood.
One of the benefits of Allback's paints is that they do not contain any solvent, so you don't end up breathing the vapors of the evaporating solvent.


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