Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Remove old panes & putty, cut & clean glass, putty & paint.
patrick
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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby patrick » Thu Apr 30, 2015 9:46 pm

John, can water borne pretreatments with mildewcide (like Copperkote) be applied in combination with a solvent borne WRP (I'm thinking specifically the mineral spirits/paraffin/alkid varnish WRP)? By this I mean applying the waterborne pretreatment, let dry, then the solventborne WRP...Or are there mildewcides that can be added to the paraffin based formula? Thanks,

Patrick

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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby patrick » Thu Apr 30, 2015 10:12 pm


johnleeke
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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby johnleeke » Fri May 01, 2015 5:47 pm


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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby johnleeke » Fri May 01, 2015 5:59 pm


patrick
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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby patrick » Sat May 02, 2015 8:03 pm



John, thanks for that tip. Now, I read the GSA document (attached link) and the preferred method is dipping, although liberal brushing is an option. My question is this: If I were to dip the windows in the WRP paraffin formula, would that have an effect on the portions of the rails and stiles that typically are left bare of paint? Does Penetrol or paraffin WRP adversely affect the operation of the window, once nicely restored and in place? Thanks,

Patrick

PS: your websites are addictive.

patrick
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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby patrick » Mon May 04, 2015 3:16 am

Two quick and probably useless observations about the above videos: The artist in the non-talkie video seems to be using what looks like Dap 33! The Sashco putty used by Mr. Gustafson is no longer offered by Sashco, on their website...

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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby johnleeke » Mon May 04, 2015 7:28 pm


patrick
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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby patrick » Tue May 05, 2015 6:19 pm


johnleeke
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Re: Sash Glazing & Painting (with Video)

Postby johnleeke » Mon Sep 21, 2015 6:36 pm

Should the putty be primed, or not?

I have always primed Sarco Multi-Glaze Type M putty and Sarco DualGlaze putty with an oil-based alkyd resin fast dry primer (California Fast Dry "Trouble Shooter" Primer, with California 2010 Acrylic waterborne topcoats) on thoroughly skinned over putty, and never had any problems, even though Sarco recommends no priming.

Primers and paints are formulated to work together forming a paint coating system with a specified thickness and performance characteristics that give maximum durability. If a component of the system, such as the primer, is left out then durability may suffer. This is why I always use a primer, even on the putty. I'm now getting 15 to 20 year life on painting sash, including the putty, with this method.

I believe the good folks at Sarco recommended against primer because they have gotten many calls from people having problems using the wrong kind of primer and not letting the putty skin over enough. There are penetrating slow-dry primers that have types of solvents that are very slow to evaporate, and this can cause putty wrinkling and other problems with the putty. (These slow-dry primers ARE very effective and durable on wood.) The Sarco folks end up recommending against all primers because it is difficult for many people to recognize the difference between the types of primer and for many of them to develop methods and procedures that are effective, such as waiting long enough for effective skinning over.
This is a popular recommendation with some window specialists because it means they can get the sash out of the shop quicker and with less work.

If you follow the sash glazing and painting method and procedure in my book, Save America's Windows, you should be able to use the materials mentioned above with good results in most climates around the country.

It is always a good idea to test any methods and materials that are new to you on just one or two windows, before proceeding with more extensive work. Some materials and methods may work fine in one climate and not in another, or for one worker and not another.

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Skin Over Timing

Postby johnleeke » Tue Oct 27, 2015 3:39 pm

How to know if the putty has skinned over enough to go ahead and paint:

Use your Judgement
After glazing wait until the putty has "skinned over" before painting. Different putties and different environments will have different skin over times, which can range from a few days to several weeks. Gently stroke the putty surface with a clean finger, if it feels oily it needs more time. If it feels dry it's ready to paint. If you are unsure, wait that much longer again.

Do a Skin Over Test
Also, when you are glazing, you can do a simple test: apply a few square inches of putty to a board, make it about as thick as your lines of glazing. Leave the test board next to your sashes as you wait for them to skin over. Then you can touch and poke at this test patch every few days to determine if the putty has skinned over. You can even make two or three test patches. Use one for touching and poking. When you think they have skinned over, you can try painting one patch to see what happens. If the skin of the putty wrinkles up, or something else goes wrong, wait for more skin over time, then try painting on the third patch. When everything goes well on the test patches, you know it's OK to paint the putty on your sashes.


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